8 Bucket List Ideas for Places to Visit in India

If you are thinking of exploring India during your next vacation, make sure you take a peek at various forms of culture and the vivid natural beauty. Take your time and travel your heart out in this beautiful land. Here, all is the land of saints and sages, all is the land of soldiers and warriors, all is the land of teachers and mentors, so magnificent is this land!

Now if we talk about the captivating hill stations of India, India is blessed with some of the most astounding places best suited for a traveler.

Bucket List Ideas for Places to Visit in India

So, when you visit these spots you can more readily pass judgment on why the Gods picked only India to make it their homeland.

1. Diamond Triangle of Odisha


Drive to Chilika Lake and then to Gopalpur along the sea. Kalijai Temple is located in an island on the Chilika lake which is the largest saltwater lake of Asia. It is accessible from Barkul via boats. The government boats charge Rs 260 per person and the journey takes more than 3 hours. One of the longest dam in the world in the largest artificial lake of Asia, Hirakud Dam is in the solitary majesty through the great river Mahanadi.

Drive to Konark, where the Sun Temple that is on the beach of the Bay of Bengal is an architectural marvel. Of particular interest to tourists are the southern coasts of Gopalpur and Dhabaleswar, which have long been surpassed by the more popular ones near Puri.

Spend the day in the artisan village of Raghurajpur near the lace that specializes in paintings of Patachitra, an art form belonging to Batik using bright colors painted on palm leaves. Continue towards Bhubaneshwar and stop at Dhauli Stupa where Ashoka of Kalinga dynasty embraced the teachings of Buddha.

Sand art, though has its origin in modern times, still is brought to its best in Odisha by none other than Sudarshan Pattnaik. Sambalpuri Nritya, Chhau Nritya are the most popular semi-classical dances, having their origin in Odisha. Odissi is a well-known classical dance of Odisha. Baliyatra and Panchuka Punei are some more auspicious festivals of Odisha celebrated with great pomp and pleasure.

Manabasa Gurubara, an auspicious ceremony is observed by married women for four consecutive Thursdays on the occasion of Lakshmi Brata in the month of Margashira. Jhoti chita (hand drawings with rice paste) on floor and walls reflect Odia culture and tradition. Khudurukoni Osha is very popular and is meant for unmarried girls only with joy and delight on their faces when they go to pluck flowers along with their favourite sakhis and sahelis.

Poda Pitha, Enduri Pitha, Manda Pitha, Tala Pitha, Chakuli Pitha, Pahala rasagulla, Chhena Poda are some of the most popular Odia delicacies. In fact, Pahala in Odisha is as famous as Kolkata for Rasagulla.

2. Riding on an Elephant


If you visit any of the large forts of North India, you will be offered the chance to take an elephant ride. It is not only a great photo opportunity, but you will also see more of the town below. You can travel in comfort, but be sure to arrange your tour ahead, or you might end up paying extra for a few bananas for the beautifully decorated elephants.

3. Visiting the Temples


In Chhattisgarh you will find the Teevardev Mahavihara. Visiting the temple is a once-in-a-lifetime experience, and you should not miss it. Jogimara cave is next to Sita Bengra in Ambikapur. The ceiling and walls of this cave is filled with drawings of birds, flowers and human figures executed to perfection in red, yellow and black, dating from the 3rd century.

4. Seeing a Palmist


If you believe in Vedic astrology, you might want to find out what traditional palmists have to say about your future. Palmists do not charge an arm and a leg in India, and you will be surprised how much they will know about you in just a few minutes. You can ask them any questions and their predictions are said to be pretty accurate.

5. Visiting a Market


If you would like to try the local Indian cuisine, you might want to avoid the tourist areas and go to any of the local markets to taste the real street dishes offered for Indians like chhena poda. You can also shop for fabric, get a kilt or a local garment made in just a few hours to measure for much less than it would cost you to visit any tailor shop at home.

Be sure to make the most out of your money, though, and always use the local currency. Check out the Currency exchange prices and compare them as the rates vary at different locations. If you are visiting India, you need to engage with the locals and experience life through their eyes.

6. Make Time for a Comfortable Farm Stay


If you like it simple and want to get back to the roots, organic farm stays are your best option. Listen to the sound of birds chirping, know how your food grows and eat it fresh, smell the fragrance of the rich soils and view India in its most rustic form. Break away from the shackles of the urban life for a while and keep yourself grounded in the simplicity of life on a farm.

7. Attend the Holi Festival


In India each year, spring is welcomed in a very special way. Holi, is the festival of colors and one of the most important festivities in the country. During this celebration, people paint and throw colored powders called Gulal. The party begins on the first full moon night usually at the beginning of March, with the one known as Holika Dahan, which revolves around the bonfire.

During this evening, people take the opportunity to prepare sweets such as a pie filled with dried fruit, or succumb to the romance between fire shavings and sandalwood aroma.

One of the most famous versions is Lathmar Holi in the state of Uttar Pradesh, more specifically in the villages of Vrindavan and Barsana not far from Mathura, during which the women of the village go to the square where they beat the men with a stick. In Delhi, different parties vibrate around the city between DJ's, colors and laughs in a much more cosmopolitan atmosphere.

Jaipur welcomes even more colors and even a festive Elephant that is celebrated on the same day as Holi. The powerful intoxicating effect of the bhang is an important part of the celebration of Holi, a festival that knows no restrictions. Its consumption is especially rampant in the north of the country, where it is celebrated with a special enthusiasm.

The drinks and food is impregnated with bhang. The bhang ki thandai, a cold drink made with almonds, rose petals, ginger and spices such as garam masala, the pakoras and the vadas, all hide that secret and sacred ingredient that helps to intensify the festive spirit of Holi. One of the most popular variants is bhang lassi, a drink made from fresh leaves and cannabis seeds and a yogurt milkshake with spices.

Shantiniketan, in the state of Bengal, gathers Tagore recitals among colored powders, games and women dressed in yellow representing abundance. A version called Basant Utsav that links with the turmeric color that invades Manjal Kuli, the discrete Holi of Kerala. In Punjab, Holi is celebrated as Hola Mohalla, a day reserved in honor of the Sikh warriors through more solemn but equally enjoyable rituals.

8. Spa in the Himalayas


It is situated near the cities of Rishikesh and Haridwar. Ananda in the Himalayas is one of the best spa hotels and amazing destinations which gives you unprecedented experience an amazing luxury. It is a wonderful place for recreation and relaxing which is added with adventure and fun games like nature trek, golf, billiards and wildlife safaris. Located about 260 kilometres from Delhi, Ananda is accessible by train, road and air and is considered one of the most luxurious experiences in India.
Kalyan Panja

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