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Hell! No Saints in Paradise by A.K. Asif is both a piercing parody and a metaphor that takes urban fiction to giddy heights.

2050, New York. Ismael, a Pakistani-American student, enters into a pact with mystical beings. They guide him on a dangerous excursion of self-discovery.

A non-believer, Ismael must return to Pakistan. The country is in the grasp of a ruthless fundamentalist régime. He has to gain the trust of his separated dad, a conspicuous radical in the Caliphate. To achieve this, he must pretense as a true believer. Will he endure long enough to penetrate his father's innermost altar? Can he complete his assignment?

The Islamic character has taken on a particular importance in the collective consciousness. Many literary sources, documentaries, and traditions have intertwined especially in the last decades. They give us triumphal or dramatic representations of public opinion.

It is from this limit that Asif's work shines with its own light on a wider horizon. He abandons the safe roads of historiography and documentation. The only aim is to tell the story of a boy in the quest to change the radical character of a place.

The author highlights a story from the point of view of Muslims. He interprets events in the context of the Islamic world. This work thus tries to put new eyes on a saturated issue of publications and does it well.

Asif releases a wealth of material that overrides the very conception of "holy war". Ismael attempts to become an interpretive bridge loaded with new perspectives. All this in a space-time analysis completely opposed to his father. Their perception of the Islamic world does not follow the same patterns and the same time bands.

The Islamic world painted by Asif requires geographical and chronological limits other than those drawn from the traditional perspective. And so we find ourselves in a dynamic analysis of a State and the Islamic society of a future. The distant and exotic descriptions emphasize an era that intrigues and entertain.

The sliding prose leads us to the roots of an Islamic world with lively and contradictory relationships to a sort of deconstruction of the myth of the religious component. The analysis offered has very few saints and heroes, but many smart politicians.

In this book, we can read the real vision of Ismael. He has to act to avoid a clash between specific realities pursuing ground and land interests. All this without ever interrupting profound socio-cultural relations. Asif does not fail to evoke it every so often.

So, in the game of great interests, Asif also gives space to the life of small communities that disappear from collective memory. This work, without any pretense of exhaustion, can be the first step towards a new course of study.

The book offers the reader an arduous and fascinating search path, extending with considerable expertise one of the abysmal themes of mystical reflection.

Hell! No Saints in Paradise by A.K. Asif
Kalyan Panja Kalyan Panja Author
The powerful Himalayas, the gem of the elegant nature and extremely impressive atmosphere offer an eye-catching flood of trails accessible for adventure lovers. In the Himalayas, trekking is the dream comes true of every climber. Trekking is the most charming adventure in months of winter because the snow surrounds the trees and mountains clothed themselves with thick white covers of snow. From all around the world, the beautiful Himalayas allure every climber and trotter.

Whenever you need some break from your schedule and also feel that urban area has become tedious, then experience trekking in the attractive Himalayas. Pure and uncontaminated air, and untouched environment, and of no doubt the grace of the mountains will lift your spirits definitely. There is no other place on the earth like the Himalayas.

Experience trekking in Himalayas

So, when you want to want some thrill and adventure in life, then the Himalayas is the best place to experience. When you perceive that what number of prominent trekking trails pervade the Himalayas, your mind will surely wonder while trekking in Nepal Himalayas or in India. Some of the popular trekking routes in Indian Himalayas are:

1. Kashmir Great Lakes Trek


The purpose of the Kashmir Great Lakes trek is to hike from Sonamarg to Naranag through the Nichnai Pass. The Great Lakes, as the name suggests, runs through long alpine lakes located at the foot of the snowy mountains. It crosses creeks, many colorful meadows and crosses three mountain passes.

The best time to do a walk would be between July and September, since the prairie road is in full bloom and climatic conditions with the average temperature between 18 and 20 degrees during the day and 3 to 4 degrees at night. The most popular trek that covers the lake are Twins lakes of Vishansar and Krishansar and Gadsar.

2. Tarsar Marsar Trek, Kashmir


Aru Valley is base camp for the Tarsar-Marsar trip, which is another 12 kms before Pahalgam. Start the walk with a constant movement of 2 to 3 hours through a magnificent path of pine forests. This is an uphill climb but easy and enjoyable. Walk along the Lidder River, which connects with the village uphill. Begin your walk along the Lidder river that will take you to the pine forest.

There will also be the excitement of crossing the river. Make a brief stop in the huts of Gujjar and enjoy a tea and snacks before continuing the walk. The road will go through lush pastures before reaching Sumbal. From here the path will take to a ridge in a stream that will take later to Tarsar. After a couple of hours, a spectacular conical summit will offer breathtaking views of the almond-shaped Tarsar lake.

Cross the Tarsar pass at an altitude of 13,500 ft. Walk on a seat on a ledge on the far side of the Marsar lake. It is an extremely beautiful location. Go down to Sumbal from Sonmasti and then go to Srinagar, with the aim of reaching before dark.

3. Chadar Trek, Ladakh


The Chadar Trek is also known as the Lower Zanskar Gorge and is a winter trail on the frozen river in Ladakh in Jammu and Kashmir. This trek is known as Chadar trek because Chadar refers to the blanket as the Lower Zanskar River transforms from a fast flowing river into a white sheet or from the ice sheet during the winter.

Trekkers can also experience the beautiful ice from a bluish tint to golden yellow on a moonlit night. The best part of the beauty of this place is the shape of ice that breaks and changes color in the river every few hours. This trek is completely unique in terms of landscape, atmosphere, temperature and also changing Chadar.

This region has an altitude of around 12,000 to 13,000 feet and covers an area of ​​7,000 square kilometers. Between January and mid-February, this valley has desolated raw winters with very little direct sunlight. If ice skating is too conventional take advantage of the experience of trekking from another level in conjunction with one of the most dangerous roads in the world.

Walk on the snow cover of the frozen Zanskar River through the stretches of snow-capped mountains. The magical charm and beauty of the snowy valleys are incomparable. The temperature of the region drops as low as -20 degrees Celsius at night. You may want to work on your endurance before embarking on this exciting journey.

4. Stok Kangri Trek, Leh


Leh, the capital of Ladakh is the best option for trekking in India, as it is located at approximately 6153 meters above sea level. It is one of the highest trekkable peaks in the world. It is the highest mountain in the Himalayan range stok. The Stok Kangri is very famous among walkers and novice mountaineers due to its technical nature.

From July to August, this peak is considered non-technical. This trek requires a lot of resistance, both physically and mentally, so if you are riding you will definitely love this trek. The biggest challenge of this place is the summit of the day when the temperature drops below zero degrees centigrade.

Experience trekking in Himalayas

5. Kolahoi Glacier Trek


Kashmir is like nowhere else in the Himalayas with its good-looking meadows and elevated pine trees. Experience panoramic visions of the all-around snow-laden peaks and meadows flourishing with wildflowers. The Sindh River, where rafting is usually practiced, meanders through the valley, and ponies can be hired for an excursion to the Thajiwas glacier, one of the biggest attractions during the summer months.

It is a small route of just 4 kilometers that reaches a small valley at the foot of the glacier. Once there, there is a path that leads to the Shakhdar hill, from which you can see beautiful views of the north-western glacier.0From Sonamarg there are trekking routes that reach the lakes of the Himalayas such as Vishansar (4,084 masl), Krishnasa (3,810 masl) and Gangabal (3,658 masl). Other lakes of the region can be cited as Gadsar, which is fed by glaciers and is surrounded by beautiful alpine flowers.

A nearby excursion is Baltal, about 15 kilometers north of Sonamarg, which is a small valley at the foot of the Zoji La pass. Hikers can reach the splendid roof of the world - Leh, crossing the pass of Zoji La. From here you can also take a day trip and reach the famous sacred cave of Amarnath.

6. Parang La Trek, Himachal Pradesh


Parang is the most famous trekking route of Spiti since ancient times and connects Spiti with that of Ladakh after crossing the mighty 5,670m pass. This walk has a fantastic view of the mountains and the Pare Chu river. This is a paradise for photographers, as it takes you through the deep gorges and desert surroundings of the Spiti Valley to the vast landscapes of Ladakh to Lake Tso Kar, passing through the beautiful villages of Karzok on the shores of the lake and ends at Lake Tso Moriri.

This lake is one of the most beautiful lakes in the world. This remote trail follows the traditional trade route between the people of Spiti, Changthang and Tibet. It begins in the high-altitude meadows of Khibber, the breeding ground of the famous Spiti horses (Chumur) and also the homeland of the snow leopard.

The trail descends through the Khibber gorge and then climbs Parang La (5600 m), the source of the Pare Chu river, the only one of its kind that originated in India, flows into Tibet and re-enters the country. Spiti. On the other side of the pass, the trail follows a wide valley to the confluence of Pare Chu with Phirtse Phu in Norbu Sumdo.

A river crossing here leads one to an almost incredible change of scenery as we walk towards the Rupshu plains of Changthang, known for the abundance of Kiangs (Tibetan wild asses). As for the nomads of Changpas, they will make you taste their specialty of dried meat and their tea with salted butter!

7. Spiti Left Bank Trek, Himachal Pradesh


Take a taxi to Poh. On the first day of hiking to Dhankar, located northwest, well above the left bank of the Spiti River, the first 5 km are along the road to Kaza. Pass by old junipers, protected from the axe by divine intervention (they belong to the gods). The road heads westward to Spiti Valley and moves towards a long leaning bank called Poh Maidan.

Going up gradually, you stay with the motor path to the other end of this terrace. Then walk down the steeper bank, smaller up, to the west. Stumpy junipers, thorny hawthorn, wild roses and dusty ephedra, which grow even on the driest slopes, give life to Poh Maidan.

On the other side of the Spiti valley, numerous silver stripes fed by Lake Sopona descends the steep slopes, breaking the brown monotony with refreshing vegetation. Crossing a low ridge a sudden patch of greenery appears. This is the village of two houses in Londupdin (3,700 m), well above the left bank of the Nipti Nallah.

The two villages of Mane are visible through the Spiti River. The green of its irrigated fields contrasts sharply with the bottom. Immense slabs of sharply sloping gray rock and brown and yellow slopes reach a crest of Manerang Peak. Crossing the small stream of Nipti halfway between a series of small waterfalls, the path, which continues northwest, crosses next to another large terrace.

Then, passing another small plot of land, the track gradually climbs up to meet the Sichling-Dhankar road. A slightly steeper climb through the fields of Dhankar Village (3,700 m) leads one to the new monastery building. Climb to Lake Dhankar, located in the arid pastures north of the village.

Between the Pin and the Spiti, the long and flat triangle of Pindomor, with its profuse green cover, is a refreshing change for the eyes. On the vast plains of Sublingo Maidan, the road turns north into the Lingti Valley. Shortly after, one can find the link road that takes off from the Sumdo Kaza road.

Then, to the left, the Lingti Valley opens. The village of Chabrang can be seen on the right bank. The much larger Rama Village is right below. Beyond Chabrang, huge terraces, stained with young and green trees, mark the entrance to the steep valley that leads to Demul, the easternmost village of the Bhar highlands.

Also, exploring the monastery complex in Lalung (3,680m) should definitely be on the agenda, initially winding westward around the dry slopes facing south with the wide valley of the Spiti River of many channels below. The Pin River, which emerges from a narrow valley on the opposite side, also widens before encountering the Spiti.

Once past the pedestrian bridge and having passed the village of Sanglung, located on a terrace on the left bank of Lingti, the route extends through the narrow valley of the Demul stream. To the left (south), the Demul Link Road crosses the slopes, ending abruptly on steep cliffs that descend to the main valley of Spiti.

Looking back towards the Lingti, Manerang rises in the distance while, closer, Kamelang dominates Lalung. Until the valley of Lingti, the snow-covered peaks mark the division with the Valley of Gue to the east. Immediately to the north, through a deep valley that descends quickly from the pastures, there is a tall, beautiful ridge covered with snow that extends westward to Chau Kang Nelda (6,303 m).

There is soft, mossy grass (nema) near the water. In other places, there is a low and uniform growth of shrubs that survive with the humidity of the snows that melt late. To be up to date with the lark of the residents of Demul can mean a nice, long day meandering over the pastures before reaching Langza for a night stop.

Going around the hill behind the village, you must go back south to join the direct route over Lara. It is a longer path but with a more gradual ascent and a better view. Then, through a small hump, are the soft, moss-covered bushes of the Chame Meadow (4,400 m).

It is possible to run southwest to Kaza from here in less than 3 hours, through the village of a house in Kagti (4,100 m). The westernmost road of Langza climbs gently from Chame, to the upper basin of the Kaza stream. A vast amphitheater of undulations, which gradually submerges to a sudden drop in the extreme south, meets the eye. At the upper end (north) is the village of Komik, on top of which is the new Tangguid Monastery (4,450 m).

From Komik, one can follow a motor road, circling up Hikkim Town (4,360 m) to reach Langza (4,300 m) through a low ridge. More exciting and offering magnificent views of Chau Chau Kang Nelda is the highest ridge above Hikkim. It approached the diagonal slopes to the northwest of the monastery, so leaving Hikkim on the left, the route climbs more than 250 meters higher, to reach Langza from the northeast.

The fossils are scattered in abundance on the slopes behind Langza. With luck, one can pick up some ammonites in this stretch. One can move north from Demul and then turn west through gently sloping grasslands instead of taking the south route on the Chame route. You will enjoy spending time here with the dokpas (shepherds), tending the dairy cattle and preparing butter for the long winter months.

Climbing gradually to the northwest, the trail slides over the ridge separating the Lingti basin from that of Shilla Nallah. Up close, in the shadow of Chau Chau Kang Nelda, the route passes through Komik and Tangguid. Then, heading southwest along the smooth contours of an irrigation channel once over the small ridge, it comes directly to Langza.

Those who do not want to trek somewhat harder the next day can head to the comforts of Kaza for a 10 km link road from Langza (4,300 m). The strongest souls face a steep descent northwest into the gorge of the Shilla Creek and an even longer ascent that continues northwestward to the tiny village of six houses in Tashigong.

A motor road crosses the low ridge on the side of Spiti (south) and gentle slopes through this ridge lead west to Gette Village. From Gette, an option for those wishing to shorten the walk and quickly reach the main valley is a zigzag path that leads directly to the precipice Monastery of Ki 500 m lower. The road runs towards Kibber (4,120 m) about 5 km northwest.

The camp can be reached by Kibber or a little further on the edge of the village fields. From Kibber, to the right (north) is the route to Ladakh on the Parang La. Directly opposite is the village of Chicham (4,150 m), on the other side of the gorilla-shaped valley of the tributary of Spiti river.

The sixth day of Poh requires moving in a semicircle to the north, around the crest behind Chicham, to the justly famous Ladarcha meadows. The route from Kibber leads to the Parilungbi Gorge along a motor road. On the other side of a bridge, it goes northwest towards the valley of a smaller tributary, which descends from the side of Ladarcha (4,150 m).

The road crosses to the right bank of this stream very soon. Then up the valley to the northwest, leaving Chicham on the left. Near the Dumle village, the narrow valley turns into a gentle decline and the pasture-covered grass field follows shortly after. Climbing gradually from Dumle, the road winds westward towards the Spiti River, which makes Ladarcha appear in an hour.

At more than 4,000 m, Ladarcha is a vast expanse of gentle slopes, carpeted with low shrubs and mossy grass from the highland pastures, and you can camp almost anywhere. It's easy 3 hours from Kibber to Ladarcha. Ladarcha was the site of Spiti's annual barter fair in the old days. The whole afternoon is free to go in search of the Tibetan snow cock and the blue sheep,

To the left (southwest) there is a low elevation, barely higher than the meadows. Mark the edge of the cliffs that descend to the river. Descending towards the southwest to the riverside terraces, the road moves towards the northwest by the left margin of the Spiti. Downstream is the small isolated Chikzur village and across the Spiti River, the largest village in Pangmo.

Climbing gradually, past the strange totems sculpted in the sedimentary soil prone to erosion by the melting of melted snow, one approaches the Takling affluent of the Spiti. Once you have negotiated the short and steep descent and then the steep ascent to the north at the other end of the ravine, Kiato is less than an hour (3,950 m). With more than half a day to spare, one can take a bus or truck to Kaza or continue with Spiti.

8. Indrahar Pass Trek, Himachal Pradesh


Himachal Pradesh is famous for its natural beauty with spectacular snow-capped peaks and river valleys. Almost all adventurers suitable activity for the mountains can be done here such as trekking, rafting, paragliding, skiing. Indrahar Pass is the most impressive treks in the Himalayan region. It is located at an altitude of 4,342 m above sea level.

Indrahar Trek Pass is closer to the tourist city of Dharamsala. Many tourists visit this place during the trekking season from April to October. The hike begins at McLeodganj which is the seat of the Dalai Lama and passes over the snow-covered Dhauladhar range and ends at the chamba. Indrahar trek will give you an opportunity to walk the ancient road of Gaddi shepherds.

8. Triund Trek, Himachal Pradesh


One of the most attractive walks for beginners, this trek starts from McLeodganj or what is lovingly called Mini Tibet. It is a 4-5 hour walk from Bhagsu Nath, the ancient Shiva temple near German Bakery. Largely unexplored by Indian hikers, you are likely to encounter many foreigners along the way.

This is perfect for those wishing to go to the hills before going to the hut with adventure, since their small restaurants and camping equipment are available all the way. Start trekking early in the morning, as you will be in the shade of the pines before the sun sets.

The mysteriously fascinating and always covered with snow of Dhauladhar closes when arriving at Triund. Climb a camp right there, while the stars hang loose on you, just an arm's length away. And yes, in the morning, you can walk to the snow line. With a little luck, the people around will give you snowballs. You need 2 days for Triund Trek.

9. Chandrakhani Pass Trek, Himachal Pradesh


This is an easy 3-day trek with the possibility of varying the duration to adapt to your time. It is exhausting but not impossible to reach Malana (2,652 m) from Naggar in one day, or one can camp for a day near the Chanderkhani pass. An additional day in Malana may also be worth learning the customs and unique traditions of the people. Malana has many interesting stories associated with that.

Some people claim that it is the oldest democracy in the world, while others trace the remote village to a wandering group of soldiers of Alexander the Great's army. Drink some unpasteurized milk obtained from Gujjars. Run into an isolated Malana dogri (part-time in the fields) and experienced the wonderful hospitality that simple rural people provide to complete strangers.

A wooden temple for Tripura Sundari, the deity who presides over the region, is here. The other prominent temples found in Naggar are the Gauri Shankar Temple, the Murlidhar Temple in Thawa and the temple dedicated to Vishnu. Russian painter, poet and philosopher Nicholas Roerich lived here for many years. The small art gallery in his old house offers a vision of his mystical interpretation of the Himalayas.

Naggar is a postcard village with terraced fields, lush forests and unbeatable views. Located on a wooded hillside, it dominates a magnificent panorama of the valley, with the Rohtang pass to the north and Kullu and Bajaura to the south. The constant ascent of almost 3 km takes approximately one hour to reach Rumsu Village (2,200 m), east of Naggar.

Tirthan Valley is one of the many underestimated valleys of Himachal Pradesh. It is located in the Kullu district and is the gateway to several walks in the region. The Tirthan Valley receives its name from the Tirthan River whose banks it is located in. There is plenty of good reason for Tirthan Valley to claim to the anglers' paradise sobriquet. Being neighbours with the Great Himalayan National Park is no small boast.

The next three important places of pilgrimage are located within the park, which is at high altitude and is accessible only during the summer and autumn months. These sacred sites are Raktisar, which is at the head of the Sainj River; Hanskund is located at the headwaters of the Tirthan River and Sirikhand Mahadev, which is a sacred lake in relation to Lord Shiva, located on the southern border of the Great Himalayan National Park.

Then, there is a pagoda style temple of Rishi Manu, and the temples of Gushaini and Galiard with wood carvings in the Tirthan Valley of prime importance.

Just pack your trekking gear to conquer this little-explored UNESCO World Heritage Site. Alternatively, one can choose the jeep road that leads to Rumsu (5 km), which gradually climbs through the mixed forest. Chanderkhani Pass is located southeast of Rumsu Village. From the village, a broad, clear and defined path, frequently used by the locals, leads southeast through the forest to the pastures of Stelling (2 km) and Ghalkrari (4 km).

After Ghalkrari, bhojpatra (birch) trees replace oak and conifer. The track climbs further through the pastures to reach a place called Shillu Pathar(5 km). You can camp anywhere in these pastures after Rumsu, but it is recommended to travel 5-6 km (1-11/2 h) from Rumsu. Water is available in many places and one can camp in a convenient place near a water source.

From the Shillu Pathar camp, the trail climbs gently up the grassy slopes and heads southeast to reach Paror , a place considered sacred by the villagers of Rumsu and Malana. The idols of the local gods mark the place. From here, one can continue towards Dhalakda Pathar (move stone), a water point. This section is almost on the crest of the Chanderkhani Range. From the top, you can see the range of Bara Bhangal to the west, Pir Panjal to the north and Parvati to the east.

The descent to the Malana village (4 km) is steep compared to the ascent to the pass. The road becomes slippery and risky during the rainy season, from July to August, when the high and humid grass darkens the points of support. Two clearly marked trails, both often used, descend abruptly to the southeast through thick coniferous forests to reach the village.

Malana has its own code of conduct for outsiders. In the village, strangers are expected to stay on defined paths. Visiting temples or even touching temple walls or stone slabs is prohibited. Violation of the rules results in a fine. In many places, there are tables that show warnings.

In recent years, the fame of Malana cannabis has also brought unwanted habits and, occasionally, unpleasant visitors. Outside the main village, on the south side, there are some guest houses and a tent settlement where the accommodation and boarding house are located.

A steep but well-defined path descends south from Malana to Jari. The path descends for almost half an hour through the fields, to enter a forest where deodorants predominate. Then it descends sharply to the southeast for almost 2 hours, to a small concrete bridge over the Malana Nallah. In a moment, this section had no road. The heart-rending descent through the rocky walls of the Malana gorge added to the mystique of the region.

From the bridge onwards, the grade is smooth, descending to the southwest along the left bank of Malana Creek. A one-hour walk takes you to the site of the Malana Power Project dam. Here, some dhabas provide food and tea. A jeep road to Jari (1,500 m/10 km) connects the site of the dam and, hopefully, you can take a taxi on your way to Malana or to the site of the dam.

Alternatively, one has to walk towards Jari. Follow the road (take shortcuts wherever possible) that descends south to a bridge that crosses the Parvati River near the machine house of the Malana Project. When crossing the bridge, exit the road and follow a path to get to Jari on the Kullu-Manikaran road.

For the more adventurous, this is a good option to cross one more pass before arriving at Kasol Village on the Kullu-Manikaran road. From Kasol, board a bus to Manikaran, the picturesque pilgrimage center just 4 km upstream along the Parvati River from here.

10. Pin Bhaba Pass Trek, Himachal Pradesh


The pin bhaba pass trek offers an incredible glimpse of the isolated valleys of Spiti, Pin and Kinnaur in the beautiful and little-known region of Himachal Pradesh. To get to Kafnu, the starting point, fly to Shimla and drive to Kafnu or fly to Kullu and drive to Kafnu through the Jalori Pass.

It is a gradual walk with a gradual climb, and continues to move in the same way along the Bhaba River. Passing through the rich deodar mixed forest, the last part of the ascent opens into a large meadow. The walk from Mulling to Kara takes you through rocks and meadows, and on the little walk between the two, you can see the Kara valley, like a large meadow.

There is a small and beautiful lake in Kara that offers a wonderful reflection of the powerful mountain ranges in front. From Kara, you enter the left valley. As you ascend gradually, the valley narrows, but the landscape will surely win your heart with alpine flowers at the bottom of the valley and waterfalls on the contiguous hills.

Travel to Phaldar by the Bhaba Pass (13,776 feet) also Tari Khango or Tarik la in seven or eight hours. The steep and rocky zig-zag path is home to the snowcocks. You can see them appear suddenly and then disappear so quickly camouflaging the surroundings. By crossing snow fields and rocky moraines, you reach the top where you can see the contrast that nature has created.

On the side of Spiti, you can see the rugged brown and barren mountains in contrast to the lush green valley of Spiti. Once at the top, you start to descend through a few glaciers and then hit the rocky moraines again. After walking for another hour, you enter an open valley with chocolate-colored mountains. You have to go down to the river. In this section, you cross the highest possible point of the walk to 16,000 feet.

After doing many mountain treks up and down, it is possible that this floor on small rocks is a bit boring, but the beautiful landscapes that surround it keep you busy by clicking on the images. As you walk forward, you can see the road that crosses the river that leads from the famous Pin Parvati Pass trek.

As you go through, you see a green patch with many Spitian houses, which is the village of Mudh that falls on the road on the last day of the walk. This day, walk all day through the Pin Valley National Park that is home to the elusive snow leopard. After arriving in Mudh, you can also go on a jeep safari to Kullu through the Rohtang Pass to see the beautiful Chandratal Lake.

11. Hampta Pass Trek, Himachal Pradesh


One of the most popular multi-day treks in India is the 4 day Hampta pass trek. Travel by bus until you reach Jobra. It takes about 5 hours to reach Balu Ka Gera. Shea Goru is a step used regularly for centuries by the shepherds and traders of the area. It takes between 3 to 4 hours to get from Chatru to Chandratal by van. The lake is 4200 meters above sea level and is located in the middle of Kullu Valley. Return by van to Manali (6 hours journey) and end this adventure.

12. Kalihani Pass Trek, Himachal Pradesh


The black glacier pass is an old shepherds' trail in Himachal Pradesh around the remote village of Bara Bhangal. This is a complicated technical crossing through the ice, glacier and moraine, culminating in a pass located at 4,725 meters above sea level. Although the gradient is moderate, prepare for abnormal hail storms, long walks and total isolation. But if that sounds like your idea of ​​heaven, this path is obligatory!

13. Parvati Valley Trek, Himachal Pradesh


It is a one hour climb to the southeast to the top of the Rashol Pass (3,250 m) from the campsite. On the other side, the road descends to the southeast through a thick forest of conifers. The descent is difficult with certain sections being very steep. Negotiate Carefully Rhododendrons appear in large numbers near Rashol Village.

There is a cave shelter 1 km from the town. A suitable trail descends south from Rashol Village for approximately 2 hours, to Chalal Village on the right bank of the beautiful Parvati River. From here, the track descends to cross the river by a wooden bridge and then climbs the other side to reach Kasol (1,580 m) on the Kullu-Manikaran road.

14. Bhubhu Pass Trek, Himachal Pradesh


Here is a trek that is relatively easy, fast and isolated. Bhubhu Pass Trek is one of the lesser-known routes in Himachal Pradesh. It goes from the Kullu valley to the Kangra valley, following the paths that the locals use in the winter. The road passes through some very remote areas and includes trekking on a series of ridges with pristine views. The pass offers spectacular views of Indrasan (6,221 meters) and Deo Tibba (6,001 meters).

15. Churdhar Trek, Himachal Pradesh


Dominating the landscape of fields, forests and ravines is the Churdhar peak, which rises to 3647 meters and is a delight for trekkers hiking through Nahan and Renuka. It can be approached through Dadahu, Sangrah, Bhawal, Gandhuri and Nauhra and is a 50 km hike. From Nauhra it is a 16 km walk. The ascent is difficult, but rewarding.

The peak offers a beautiful view of the Gangetic plains and the Satluj river in the south, and Badrinath to the north. You can also see the hills of Shimla and Chakrata and the upper part. An alternative route to Churdhar is through Rajgarh, an orchard country. One can easily see Monal in the Churdhar Wildlife Sanctuary.

To come here in the remote village of Thonta, near the village of Nohradhar, approximately 350 kilometers from Deli in the Sirmour district of Himachal Pradesh is to sleep under millions of stars, to see the sunset beyond the horizon, to gather around fires to sing and to mingle with locals, other travelers and friends.

You can climb to the top of the mountains and to the highest peaks and walk the rails of the jungle. A remote destination of the Himalayas, in the middle of nowhere, ideal for meeting ourselves and new friends.

Sirmour district is still to be explored by most travelers and is home to many hidden and unseen treasures. Waterfalls, mountain trails, villages and temples paint the landscape, a unique way to experience the Himalayas. This destination is out of conventional destinations. It still holds the essence of the real lifestyle of an Indian Himalayan village.

16. Borasu Pass Trek, Himachal Pradesh


From Kalpa, head to the Thangi village (2896 m), starting point of the hike on the pilgrimage around the sacred Kinnaur Kailash mountain. Reo Purgyil is one of the best peaks or summits near Kinnaur. Reach the village of Chitkul (3450 m) in the valley of Sangla in 4 days of walk with crossing of the Charang pass (5150 m).

After a day of discovery in the valley of the Baspa river, between Sangla and Chitkul, leave on foot (10 days of walk) to reach the Har Ki Doon valley (3550 m) then Yamunotri (3200 m), in the Garhwal Mountains, after crossing the Borasu Pass (5150 m) and Yamunotri Pass (5170 m).

17. Rupin Pass Trek, Himachal Pradesh


Uninhabited by man, the Rupin Pass is 15,250 feet above sea level, begins at Dhaula in Uttarakhand and ends at Sangla in Himachal Pradesh. The trekking route winds along the Rupin River and takes you through the icy slopes, rocks, glaciers, snow fields, wooden bridges, attractive villages, flowing rivers, expanses of grass and the evergreen Deodar forests. In addition, the view of the Kinner Kailash range is fabulous.

In addition to the different natural wonders, this trekking also offers camping opportunities in the middle of the jungle. Although the level of difficulty is moderate, but depending on the intensity of the snow, the route can become a challenge. Baraadsar lake is very close to prominent hikes such as Har Ki Dun and Rupin and Supin Valley.

18. Lamkhaga Pass Trek, Himachal Pradesh


This remote route from Himachal Pradesh ventures on the now classic route from Gangotri to Kinnaur. It is a strenuous, high-altitude trek (5,284 meters high) that is not for the faint-hearted. However, for the intrepid traveler, this is one of the most rewarding experiences in the Himalayas. June to October is the best season for this hike, but temperatures can be brutally cold, and blackouts are known to occur.

If you are embarking on this arduous journey, it is best to do so with an experienced and reputable organization; In addition, you will also need a permit, which is easier to do with professional assistance.

19. Har Ki Dun Trek, Uttrakhand


Arrive at the amphitheater of the gods! Boy! Har Ki Doon trek is a bundle of joy with its beautiful valleys and incredible views that seem taken from a fairy tale. Located at an altitude of 3566 m in the western Garhwal Himalayas Ganges, Har ki Doon is a moderate hike, offering wonderful experience for hikers.

Uttarakhand reveal the secrets of the inhabitants who live in the valley and still practice polygamy and worships Duryodhana, a Kaurava from the Mahabharata, as their deity. With an immense serenity and uncontaminated natural beauty, this hike has a wide and varied variety of flora and fauna. It is also said that this was the place from where the Pandava brothers came to.

The arduous trekking is a delight in the winter springs with everything covered by an ivory sheen. Walking along the snow-covered path, one can see the high peaks of the mountains that rise on both sides of the valley. The trail also has rare tree species of Bhojpatra and Brahmakamal also present in the Jaundar glacier and the Swargarohini glacier.

A little further on, you can camp near the traditional village of Osla, the highest in the valley. This winter trek should be on the list of enthusiasts. Climb the moraine of the Jaundhar Glacier to an altitude of 4,300 m, with the best views of the snow-capped peaks of the Swargarohini (6,252 m), the Bandarpoonch (6,361 m) and the majestic Kalanag (6,387 m).

20. Dhumdhar Kandi Pass Trek, Uttarakhand


If you are looking to escape the human race while you face the beast of a challenge, this lonely road could do the trick. The trip to the Damdar Kandi Pass is one of the most difficult in the Garhwal region of Uttarakhand and involves a long, arduous and stubborn climb.

For those who manage to do so, the uphill battle is rewarded by some of the most impressive views in the Himalayas, such as the Bandarpoonch and Swararohini peaks. You will also find a series of sanctuaries that are of profound religious importance to locals.

21. Kedarkantha Trek, Uttarakhand


One of the easiest hikes in the Himalayas, the winter walk in Kedarkantha, is a delight for snow lovers. The walk stretches through an amazing landscape that passes through beautiful villages, snow-covered fields and breathtaking views of the majestic Himalayas. Feel lucky looking at the great mountain ranges, such as Swargarohini, Bandarpunch and Black Peak. It's a great getaway from Delhi. Do not forget to make a snowman.

22. Sandakphu Trek, Bengal


Why does the path doesn't get old when everything else does? I want to go to this place now for the fourth time. The destination was never a point of contention for me. The bends, the rocky slides, the lands which felt outlandish everytime, the flowers that don the smiles, the innocuous rocks along with a wooden fire - the walk to Sandakphu and Phalut taught me life in a very detailed yet fleeting way.

I learned the rhythm that best suits every walk of life. I understood my personal demons can only be vanquished by myself only. I understood the best way of meditation is walking.

Hit this in Rimbik or Manebhanjyang, about 51 kms from Darjeeling through Silerygaon. The road to Manebhanjang follows the path of Hill Cart Road that connects Darjeeling with the plains. In Ghoom (India's highest train station), exit Hill Cart Road and it will take another hour to get from Ghoom to Maneybhanjang.

Bengal's highest peak, Sandakphu, allows you to explore Lhotse, Mount Everest, Kangchenjunga and Makalu. To get to Sandakphu, you have to walk through the Singalila National Park. It will take you to Tonglu through Meghma (4 hours), which seems attractive enough to take a tea. It is a stop on the road along the trekking route to Sandakphu or Tumling.

Although the Tonglu trails can take you to Nepal, you'd better go to Sandakphu in this race against the rains that come without invitation. An easy trek through bamboo bays will meet you on your way to Gairibas the next morning. Here a small cabin for hikers is built, and you can fall asleep before hitting it again.

Once there, you can make a pit stop and clean the lens of your camera, since a whole forest of rhododendrons extends to Kalapokhri (3186 mts). Pack enough water, since the Sandakphu Phalut trek does not have a source of water. Now, you are only 2 hours from Sandakphu.

While you enjoy the views that have four of the five highest peaks in the world, do not forget to look down at the crystal clear waters of the icy meandering river, Teesta. You need an average of 4 days for this hike. You can also move by vehicle along the picturesque route to Uttarey where your trekking begins. Crossing a beautiful forest of rhododendrons arrive at Chitra where you can set up camp.

The descent can be done to Gorkhey, a charming little town. From there you can connect with Sikkim through a mountain pass of 3400 m (Goeche La), or you can continue down to Rimbick. Descent with a difference in altitude of 1,700 m in three hours to the lowest point (Srikhola at 1900 m altitude when crossing the river).

23. Ravangla Trek, Sikkim


Oaks, hemlocks and rhododendrons are his companions in this walk. The dense forests pass right next to almost all the trekking. You can reach the start of the trek in Ravangla by taking a taxi from the New Jalpaiguri train station or from the Bagdogra airport. You can spend a night in Ravangla and see the Ralanag Monastery there. If you start early the next morning from the base camp, you will be at the top at sunset.

The walk is quite easy and straight and you will find a clearly marked path to choose from. One of the best parts of this hike is that there are some hikers in this.

24. Goechala Trek, Sikkim


When you want to experience tough and arduous trekking in the Himalayas, then go for Goecha La. Nestled between the imposing peaks of Sikkim, Nepal, China and Bhutan, lies a land of incomparable beauty that invites hikers and adventurers. Embarking on the daring Goecha trek The one that passes through the picturesque Yuksom-Dzongri pass and great views of Mt. Kanchenjunga. Feel close to nature as you pass through rhododendron forests to valleys swathed in lichen and moss.

While you are trekking in the Himalayas, your eyes will stare at a great diversity of vegetation. Trekking in the Himalayas will provide your eyes the view of oaks and maples at lower altitudes. Many sorts of animals like deer, bears, cats, and monkeys occupy the Himalayas. Trekking in the Himalayas is just worth an experience.

While going for trekking in the delightful Himalayas, add all the necessary and essential items in your bag like camping tents, ropes, trekking shoes, rain covers and many more. Experiencing trekking in the Himalayas is not just an awesome adventure to thrill. It is an experience of a lifetime.
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Kalyan Panja Kalyan Panja Author
You will be spoilt for choice when picking a holiday destination for two — the world is full of romantic locations and hideaways. Why not make India one of them? The mix of interesting culture and stunning scenery is sure to satisfy all tastes, whether you are a foodie, a history buff, or simply want a room with a view.

Why India is Ideal for a Romantic Getaway

1. Patnitop, Jammu


Jammu's own hill station, Patni Top is located at 6,640 feet, the highest point along the Jammu-Srinagar road. If you wish, there are rental ponies, and most places can be reached by car. Chinar Garden, Picnic Spot (with swings and slides) and Skating Garden are the three must see places in the standard itineraries. Take a trip to Patnitop for some solitude and to enjoy the breathtaking views of Chenab Gorge and its pines!

There are two excursions from Patnitop: one to Madha Top, the ridge in front of Patnitop, and the other to Sanasar, a meadow covered with grass and fir trees, with the nickname of mini Gulmarg. Sanasar is a center for various adventure activities, including paragliding and jungle camps. Nag Temple in Ishadhari is located within Patnitop.

Just outside of Patnitop is Shudh Mahadev ka Pahad. A little further away is Mantalai, with its apple and citrus orchards. Near Mantalai, Krimchi is the site of the oldest temples in the Jammu region. Patnitop is one of the few areas that receives snowfall in winter. In winter, there is a thin layer of snow that covers Patnitop, thin, but enough for enterprising locals who run a ski school, strictly for beginners with options of sledges, snowmen and snowball fights!

Bhaderwah is a green valley at 80 Kms from Batote and 162 Kms from Katra and more than 200 kilometers from Jammu. Bhaderwah has been compared to the Kashmir valley for its scenic splendor and is also called Chota Kashmir. The high parts of Bhaderwah have fine alpine meadows such as Jai, Padri, Seoj Dhar

2. Agra, Uttar Pradesh


Most people have heard of the Taj Mahal, one of the Seven Wonders of the World, but few people know why it was first built. In 1631, Mumtaz Mahal, wife of Shah Jahan, passed away. Shah Jahan was distraught and commissioned the building of an enormous, ivory-white marble shrine on the south bank of the Yamuna River — the Taj Mahal. The tribute to his lost love took 22 years to build and he was buried beside her after his death.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, the architecture of the mausoleum is awe-inspiring, with precious and semi-precious stones set in the marble. The Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore described the Taj Mahal as the teardrop on the cheek of time and it serves as a reminder of how enduring love can be.

There is no shortage of places to stay in Agra, from budget hostels to the 5-star hotels. Do some hunting online and you will be able to find lots of mid-range hotels that offer a comfortable stay in a beautifully furnished room. If you really want to treat yourselves, why not choose an opulent hotel suite or a luxurious air-conditioned tent?

3. Darjeeling, Bengal


In the afternoon we took a taxi to the Howrah train station on the other side of the river and at 5:30 pm we left. We slept in the train and at 6:00 we arrived at the New Jalpaiguri station about 5 km from Siliguri.

The contrast with the damp heat of the rest of Eastern Bengal and the congested streets of its capital is striking. The 3 options have as base camp the same city of Siliguri. It is the place from where the shared jeep or the toy train will take you to Darjeeling. This small blue train travels along a very narrow track and drags a handful of wagons with an old locomotive that goes from New Jalpaiguri to Darjeeling, crossing plains, mountains, old bridges and mysterious towns.

I like trains. One day, I would like to travel aboard one of these mythical trains that are the Orient Express, the Trans-Siberian or the Palace on Wheels that I saw in Jaisalmer station. While waiting for more lenient finances, it had been a few weeks since I had been hoping to discover this Darjeeling Himalayan Railway, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Starting from New Jalpaiguri, in the plains of West Bengal, the train passes through Chunabhatti, crosses the iron bridge over the Mahananda river and arrives at the Rangtong station. From there, the train faces slopes of almost 60 meters, passes through scented tea fields and arrives at the Agony Point, where you can admire the most beautiful views of the route.

As the train climbs, the landscapes change, it begins to get colder and also change the physical characteristics of the inhabitants, who in this area have Nepalese ancestry. Then you arrive at the Rangtang station, which has a privileged view of forests and hillsides, and a few kilometers further on, the train crosses a high valley with a landscape full of mountains, which are becoming closer.

The Tindharia station also receives the train. This was an old place where the tourists stopped to take the magnificent local tea, admiring the extensive vision of the mountains. Then the most dangerous and mysterious section of the route wait for the travelers, a point surrounded by mountains of stones in which the train must go of reverse by a road that has angles in zig zag.

After having enjoyed the adrenaline, you reach the Gayabari station, at 1040 meters above sea level. Later the toy train crosses the areas of Mahanadi, Giddapahar and Kurseong, a charming mountain town. To reach Tung, the next destination, travelers will cross small forests of pear, cherry, maples and cardamom plants.

At this point, Tibetan monks start walking with their colorful robes, and we reach the protected forest of Senchal, which displays its thousand-year-old oaks, orchids and magnolias so that everyone can enjoy them. Further up the mountain, the view of the Himalayas invades the senses and then you reach the Ghoom station.

Ghum is at over 2,200 meters high, which is the highest in India and the second in the world. Upon leaving Ghoom, the tracks descend as you approach Darjeeling and pass through the Batasia Loop, where you can visit some Buddhist monasteries or gompas.

Batasia Loop is a spiral railway created to lower the gradient of ascent of the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway. At this point, the track spirals around over itself through a tunnel and over a hilltop. There is a War memorial to the Gorkha soldiers of the Indian Army who sacrificed their lives after the Indian Independence in 1947.

It is 5 km from Darjeeling, below Ghoom. The view of Mount Kanchenjunga is mesmerizing from this point in clear sky. Finally, the small toy train, which seemed fragile, leaves its passengers in the final station after a journey almost all day.

Everything pleases me. The beautiful blue color of the cars, the shovels of coal that feed the engine, the quiet rhythm of this mastodon on rail and his chu-chu snoring. We like Kalimpong by the contrast it offers with our previous stop to see Lamahatta in the middle of nowhere.

Welcome to Darjeeling. Here the air is pure, the clouds wind between the peaks and the deep red robes of the monks remind you that Tibet is not far. Darjeeling is located in the border with Nepal, which in your guide Lonely Planet guide appears as West Bengal. The normal thing is that tourists (travelers, nomads or whatever you want to define) arrive in Darjeeling from Calcutta, Varanasi or Nepal.

The next day in the morning we went to the viewpoint of Bhaun Bhakta Sarani, near Chowrasta Square, from where we could see for the first time the Kangchendzonga surrounded by clouds. It is at 8,598 m and is the highest peak in India and 3rd in the world, after Everest at 8,848 m (Nepal) and K2 at 8,611 m (Pakistan). At dawn the sky is clearer than in the afternoon, which is usually cloudy.

Chowrasta area is the upper part of the city since Darjeeling is on a hillside. This is where are all the movies are shot, backpackers, shops, cafes in the British colonial style and everything you need. Mahakal Temple is on a hill top is one of the greatest spots in Darjeeling to observe the panoramic views of the mountains.

The Observatory Hill is located at the Mall area and is encircled at its bottom by the Mall Road. As you walk along the Mall road, you will see this steep hill rising on one side. And Mahakal market is just beside.

However, it's not too high. It takes about 15 minutes of uphill walk to reach to the top. While the walk may be tiring, the rewards are awesome. As you take the Mall road from the right side of Chowrasta Mall, about 100 yards away you will find flights of stairs that lead towards the Observatory Hill and the Mahakal Temple.

Then we walked to the Japanese Pagoda of Peace, one of the more than 70 pagodas built around the world, by the Japanese Buddhist organization Nipponzan Myohoji.

From there we go to Ghoom, a village 6 km from Darjeeling where we visited the Buddhist monastery Yiga Choling Gompa. The biggest tourist attraction in Darjeeling, apart from Kanchenjunga is Tea. If it did not matter to me to seem perfectly pedantic, I would say that order a Darjeeling tea on the terrace of a cafe will never be the same again.

If you want to treat yourself to a tea in the best hotel in Darjeeling for honeymoon, you can do it at the Mayfair or Windamere Hotel. It is a British colonial house converted into hotel with several rooms where tea is served with pasta, sandwiches and all the paraphernalia nourished with noodles.

The harsh reality catches up with us. To see the sun rise, one must be awake before him. It is thus wrapped up and still numb by the sleep that we reach Tiger Hill (2,590m). One of those icy mornings that make your cheeks rosy and venerate the inventor of mittens. The place is not secret and it is surrounded by dozens of people that we expect the darkness to dissipate.

Around 5 am, the sky is adorned with pastel colors and the snowy peaks start to shine. It seems that the row of vertices in front of us draws a Buddha lying on the horizon. It even seems that it is Everest that we see in the distance. And yes, it is not very close and let us not forget that its neighbors Janu, Lhotse and Makalu also border the 8000 meters of altitude.

4. Lambasingi, Andhra Pradesh


Often referred to as the Kashmir of Andhra Pradesh, Lambasingi awaits with its fog-covered forests and the rustic and classical landscape of the Indian villages. Enjoy the glow of intoxication in Lambasingi when the clouds descend to the earth, redrawing the mountain lines every day in the act of hugging and departing continuously. Walk the blessed paths that seem to merge into oblivion, making each step an acute existential experience.

5. Gandikota, Andhra Pradesh


Undeniably of Indian DNA and so unknown, Andhra Pradesh is a vast territory southeast of India. From the pristine beaches of Visakhapatnam to the calm waters of Dindi, from the beautiful Araku Valley to the caves of Borra, with an age of more than one million years, are some of its main tourist destinations. The Penna River as it passes through the town of Gandikota, is known as the Grand Canyon of India.

The ruins of the Gandikota fort tell its story that dates from the 12th century in the area of ​​the Gandikota canyon and the beautiful temple of Madhavaraya, surrounded by big canyons and arid landscapes. 300 kilometers away from the temple of Gandikota is the city ​​of Hampi in Karnataka with the Virupaksha temple, the Lotus Mahal and the Hemakuta hills.

In Anantapur you can enjoy the Ganesh Park, popularly known as Cheruvukatta, with its temples on the banks of the Ananthsagar in the old part of the city. The Anantapur clock tower, which is located in the heart of the city and remembers the days of independence, is also well known. One of the areas most visited by tourists are the ruins and the temple of Lepakshi, which is a must for almost everyone who arrives in the city.

And those who enjoy the caves, can see the Belum Caves (natural caves) about 15 kilometers from Tadipatri, or the Batrepalli waterfalls, near kadiri, although they only carry water in the rainy season.

6. Horsley Hills, Andhra Pradesh


Located in the state of Andhra Pradesh. Horsley Hills is a picturesque hill town located at 1,290 meters above sea level. The city is very close to the Koundinya Wildlife Sanctuary and you can also find the Sambhar deer early in the morning if you are lucky. The city was discovered by the British in the mid- nineteenth century and then became a summer retreat.

The Horsley Hills are famous for their picturesque surroundings and dense vegetation. One can also enjoy adventure sports activities such as Zorbing in Horsley Hills. Go to Horsley hill museum, Mallamma Temple and Highview point view to enjoy the serene beauty of the hills.

Why India is Ideal for a Romantic Getaway

7. Hampi, Karnataka


Hampi is a small town north of Karnataka, on the banks of the Tungabhadra river, and it is one of those places where you feel at ease as soon as you arrive. Hampi is located about 300 km from Bangalore. Hampi is often called the city of ruins, and some of them are listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Hampi has thousands of large rock formations, polished stones that seem to lie with their perfect forms, all distributed between kilometers and kilometers of palm trees and rice terraces.

Hampi is located literally among the ruins of Vijayanagara, the ancient capital of the Vijayanagara empire. Still today it is an important religious center, and the Virupaksha temple is a clear exponent, since important Hindu ceremonies are held continuously. The numerous Dravidian temples of the Vijayanagara Empire made it one of the largest medieval cities of the time after Beijing.

It was said to be so prosperous and beautiful that it attracted numerous merchants and travelers from other parts of the world. On the banks of the Tungabhadra River, along almost 26 square kilometers, we find today more than 1,600 remains of what was one of the most important cities of India until the sultans of the Deccan occupied and destroyed it.

All of Hampi's visitable ruins are scattered about 36 square kilometers, so it is essential to have some kind of vehicle to visit it completely. Located on the south bank of the Tungabhadra River and in a spectacular enclave, stands the oldest (and main) temple of Hampi is the Sri Virupaksha adorned with sculptures that represent gods and other divine and celestial beings, in addition to a lot of erotic figures, related to fertility rites.

In front of the Virupaksha temple is a street with old pavilions on both sides of it. It is Hampi Bazaar. To the north of Sri Virupaksha is a hill with steps called Hemakuta Hill, an excellent place to glimpse all the ruins that are in this area and, if you can, see the sunrise or sunset. The largest temples, Saasivekaalu Ganesha and Kadalekalu, are found on the side of the hill.

Mahanavami Dibba is a ceremonial enclosure built by King Krishnadevaraya to commemorate the victory over Udaigiry. Vittala Temple is the symbol of Hampi. When you get to this area you have to walk about 2 km to reach the temples. If you do not want to walk there are some carts.

One of the most striking elements within the complex of the Vijaya Vittala Temple is a sanctuary in the shape of a stone car (one of the three most famous in India) pulled by elephants and dedicated to Garuda. Inside the temple, which stands out for its elegance and grandiosity are some curious musical pillars. They say that each of them emits a different rhythmic sound when hit with a sandalwood stick.

One of the most different palaces in the entire Hampi complex is the Lotus Mahal. This building is located inside the Zenana Enclosure, used by women of royalty for recreational activities. In the center of Hampi is Matanga Hill, the best place to watch the sunset. Considered one of the five sacred lakes of India, Lake Pampa Sarovar is located south of the Tungabhadra River.

If you have more time (and desire) you can make an excursion to the other side of the river, where there are several temples, although they are not as beautiful like the Hanuman Temple. You will have to climb 572 steps to get to the top but you will enjoy incredible views of Hampi.

Achyutaraya Temple is one of the most imposing and striking. Visible from Matanga Hill and at the end of the street of the courtiers, the idol to which the temple is dedicated is Tiruvengalanatha. Very close to Hampi is Lake Sanapur, with large stones of boulders scattered here and there and fields of rice fields in the valley.

8. Chikmagalur, Karnataka


Chikkamagaluru is popularly known as the coffee land of Karnataka. It is a hill station that attracts many trekkers, honeymoon couples, explorers and nature lovers throughout the year. Mullayanagiri Peak at 6332 feet is the highest in the Chandra Drona range. Sarpadhari is the starting point of the Mullayanagiri trek.

Most tourists prefer to drive on the road that leads to Mullayanagiri Peak and take a jeep from this point. The motorized path is a completely different route from the walking walk on the Sarpadhari trail. Trekking to the top is an especially adventurous and the sunset view from the top is absolutely worth the slightly difficult climb.

There is another popular trek from Mullayanagiri to Baba Budan Giri and it is approximately a 10 km trail. Another tourist attraction here is Hebbe Falls which is gigantic and the roaring waters that fall from the high cliff makes it a magnificent site! This serene hill station has beautiful monuments like the Kondadarama temple, Veera Narayana temple in Belavadi and Markandeshwara Kandya Temple that exhibits a beautiful mixture of Hoysala and Dravidian architectural styles.

Hill stations around Chikmagalur are famous summer retreats as they remain cool even during summers. An ideal retreat of solitude and natural beauty, located in Baba Budan range, Kemmangundi has a invigorating climate that makes it an ideal hill station near Bangalore in summer. Its a quiet green mountainside and the two waterfalls - Kalahasti and Hebbe are ideal picnic areas.

The Hanuman Gundi falls look as beautiful as pearls that fall down to a hundred feet. Do not forget to bring home bags of fresh coffee powder, tea leaves and authentic spices from here! Go trekking in some of the high peaks or visit the Lakya dam. You can also visit the Radha Krishna Temple and Jamalabad Fort.

MG road in Chikmagalur is a commercial street offering everything from Ethnic and Western clothing, handbags, electronic, medical and grocery stores, restaurants, ATMs. There are also many food options street like phuchka, kulfi, momo and kebab.

The district of Koppa known for its sprawling paddy fields and the rolling Sahyadri hills is sure to leave you spellbound with its cool clime this summer!

Stay at a hip, boutique holiday home, designed tastefully while you also enjoy a session of pilates or learn a thing or two about homemade organic body products.

9. Agumbe, Karnataka


Often referred to as Cherrapunji of the South, Agumbe is a beautiful hill station located in the Shimoga District of Karnataka. The place has stunning hiking trails and beautiful spots for sunset inspection. With lush green forests and breathtaking scenic beauty, the place has guests flocking to its doors attracted by its rustic charms. Superbly well known for its second most significant annual rainfall in the country.

Agumbe is one of the highest peaks of Western Ghats. To go trekking and stop halfway in the Gopalakrishna Temple, a temple of the fourteenth century that exhibits Hoysala art.

10. Antara Gange, Karnataka


This hill station is about 70 km from Bengalore. If you like adventure and explore nature, then this is the best place that suits you. There are many caves and rock formations that can be surprised. A tour guide is recommended as there are wild animals in the vicinity. Hike in Antara Gange is suitable in the morning because the temperature is very low. When you hike take your food from Kolar town.

11. Coorg, Karnataka


Coorg often referred to as Scotland of India has been blessed by an abundant and beautiful nature. Known as Kodagu and located in the middle of ancient mountains, which protect the southernmost part of the state of Karnataka, this is an area of ​​great beauty. With its rugged terrains, green valleys and lush forests, Coorg offers a splendid panoramic and a destination of unparalleled adventure.

Coorg is famous for its vast green coffee plantations. There is a lot one can do in this beautiful hill station. You can enjoy the views of cascading waterfalls such as Abadia, Mallalli and Iruppu waterfalls. Many adventure freaks visit this place for activities such as river rafting as well. Enjoy golf and hiking and stay in a tree house in Madikeri. The monsoon attracts people who love to get soaked by the rains.

Soak in the beauty of the misty hills, coffee plantations and warm Coorg hospitality. This high-altitude corner of Karnataka is the land of spices, unique culture and cuisine.

Stay in secretly nestled homestays and unhotels, enjoy freshly brewed coffee or indulge in the local cuisine. If you are an adventurer then we have something special worked out for you. A hiking, rock-climbing and zip-lining add-on to this serene vacation.

12. Gokarna, Karnataka


Gokarna has the Western Ghats on one side and the Arabian Sea on the other. Gokarna inspires authenticity, spirituality and wraps its beaches in a warm and relaxed hippie atmosphere. It is a village located northwest of the state of Karnataka, in India. Its natural environment makes it especially unique. Although small, the village of Gokarna is submerged in a sea of ​​palm trees and is so far one of our favorite places in India.

It invades us with sensations and brings us closer to the essence of Indian mysticism. The beaches near Gokarna are exactly what someone longs for peace, introspection and connection to the jungle and the ocean. It is very easy to walk to the beaches of Kudle, Om, Paradise or Halfmoon. Visitors can also see the island of Kurumgad and the island of Anjediva from the beach! Gokarna is all that Goa is minus the crowd and marketing.

13. Mysore, Karnataka


Mysore has an impressive royal heritage, with the main tourist attraction of the city being the imposing Mysore Palace. Mysore Palace is undoubtedly one of the most famous places to see in Karnataka. There are three main temple exclusive buildings within the old fort and 18 in the Palace that faces the Chamundi hills.

There are many other interesting buildings, palaces, and temples to see. Mysore Zoo is one of the best in India. Mysore is also an excellent place to buy sandalwood, and learn Ashtanga Yoga. Srirangapatna remained included in the kingdom of Mysore from the early 17th century until the independence of India in the mid-20th century. The most representative temple of Srirangapatnam is the Ranganathaswamy Temple.

Among the other places worth mentioning in Srirangapatnam is the summer palace of Tipu Sultan called Daria Daulat Bagh. It is surrounded by beautiful gardens and inside you will find a small palace painted to the last centimeter of its walls and balustrades. There are also places to rest in the interior of the island.
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Kalyan Panja Kalyan Panja Author
Are you not motivated by the idea of having a more conventional type of pet? Some time ago I was thinking about writing about the rabbit as a domestic pet. I shared my life with Bunny for 8 years and without a doubt, it was the most beautiful experience I can remember. I am also going to give you a series of guidelines so that you can take good care of your rabbit.

Today more than ever it's worth talking about this extraordinary creature. If you want to have a domestic partner, having a rabbit may be a great option. Among other reasons because they do not need so much care.

Bunny was always quiet and peaceful. It did not usually cause problems that can disturb neighbors. And also, if you have more pets at home it will not be a problem because they adapt fast. I still remember when my little Bunny first became friends with the pet cat of mom. It was amazing to see them all together, interact and play every day.

You do not have to do a lot of exercises, and they are very affectionate. Bunny responded very well to all the expressions of affection that I gave it. Bunny was very intelligent and was very easy to raise it. It filled my life with love and joy by seeing that sweet little face. But like any animal, you must pay attention and get specific care guidelines.

Long Memories of My Bunny and Me

Whether it lives inside or outside, you will need a cage or a place of its own, where it can feel safe and have privacy. Because let's face it, animals also need their space, and a rabbit will not be any less.

If your rabbit is going to be alone a lot of time especially if you spend many hours outside working. Look for a very wide cage, where it can stretch, stand, play and in a way, have freedom of movement. Do not fall into the error of buying a small cage. Because you may get a baby but it will soon grow and will need more living space.

The bigger the cage, the heavier and happier your hairy one will be. It is important that the cage is robust and without thin wires that can cause injury. It is also important that there is a wooden board so that the rabbit can rest, and not step on the wire all the time. And if you are a crafty person, a good wooden cage in a duplex model will be amazing.

Also, inside Bunny's cage, I put a pair of wooden trunks to stretch its paws and also rub its teeth, which it always did. In my house, the cage used to be open in my room. Bunny would go in when it wanted to eat or rest, but it had all the freedom to go all over the house. I only worried about covering up conflictive areas such as windows and cables.

Do not forget that rabbits need constant physical and social stimuli. In my case, many times when we would eat, Bunny sat nearby or sat next to me when watching TV. It is about integrating your bunny into your life. It should feel that it is part of your family, so the relationship will be very close.
Kalyan Panja Kalyan Panja Author